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  • Data provided here have been collected as part of the project "Measurements and Improved Parameterization of the Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flow through First-Year Sea Ice", OPP-0126007* and include measurements of temperature and various ice properties at selected sites in first-year and multiyear sea ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in the years 2002-2004. Data from earlier installations of thermistor chains for measurements of ice temperature carried out by the New Zealand team have also been included. Data files are in Microsoft Excel format, with individual worksheets for specific cores or temperature data sets. Detailed information and comments on data sampling location etc. are provided in the files. Further information on data collection, results etc. can be found in the following publications: Backstrom, L. G. E., and H. Eicken 2007, submitted, Capacitance probe measurements of brine volume and bulk salinity in first-year sea ice, Cold Reg. Sci. Tech. Pringle, D. J., H. Eicken, H. J. Trodahl, and L. G. E. Backstrom 2007, submitted, Thermal conductivity of landfast Antarctic and Arctic sea ice, J. Geophys. Res. Trodahl, H. J., S. O. F. Wilkinson, M. J. McGuinness, and T. G. Haskell 2001, Thermal conductivity of sea ice; dependence on temperature and depth, Geophys. Res. Lett., 28, 1279-1282. Data are in Microsoft Excel format. Abbreviations: AH = Arrival Heights; CH = Camp Haskell (near Delbridge Islands); VUW = Victoria University Wellington; UAF = University Alaska Fairbanks. RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108 GET DATA: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1ooUH9dPvWT66afFC51Cb0JOHg66rn0sy

  • As part of the Scott Base Redevelopment Marine Monitoring Programme, the impact of Scott Base's activities on the local marine environment was assessed. Sampling took place at three sites around Hut Point Peninsula on the southern half of Ross Island during October – November 2019 to assess anthropogenic contamination. Two acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCP; Nortek Signature 500) were deployed, and set with a 2-minute sampling period in 1m vertical depth bins from the seabed to the underside of the ice. Instrument heads were kept ~0.5 m beneath the under-surface. ADCP data were downloaded, extracted from their raw formats, and averaged into 10-minute intervals. A magnetic declination of 141.09° E was applied to the measured current direction to correct the readings to reflect true north and a pressure offset was applied to standardise depths relative to ambient air pressure at the seawater surface. Information on habitats and benthic epifauna assemblage composition were collected using high resolution video across 2 25m transects at ~22m depth. Multiple overlapping passes were made across the seabed transects at ~0.5 m depth contours between ~20 – 26 m in order to create a 2D orthomosaic image of each site. Analysis of the diver-collected video was done using individual frames. The video along each transect was divided into 10 equal time segments and still frames were taken at random from the first, third, fifth, seventh and ninth segments. Eight video frames were analysed per transect (i.e., n=8 per transect and n=16 per site) by one individual to minimise observer bias. Sediment samples were collected by divers to determine contaminant concentrations and sediment characteristics (sediment particle size composition, organic matter content, organic carbon content and algal pigment content) at each site. Sponge species (Sphaerotylus antarcticus and Laternula elliptica) were collected for tissue contaminant analysis. Full description of methods is available at: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00300-023-03181-1 GET DATA: drew.lohrer@niwa.co.nz

  • Diatom census counts were used to quantitatively estimate summer sea-surface temperatures (SST) over the last 40,000 years in core MD11-3353, collected in 2011 on board the R.V. Marion Dusfresne west of Kerguelen Island, Southern Ocean. The transfer function used to reconstruct summer (January to March) SST is the Modern Analog Technique that here uses 249 surface sediment samples (modern analogs), the relative abundances of 32 diatom species and the chord distance to select the five most similar modern analogs (Crosta et al., 2020). This method yields a root mean square error of prediction of ~1 °C. The core chronology is detailed in Thöle et al. (2019). RELATED PUBLICATION: Civel-Mazens, Matthieu; Crosta, Xavier; Cortese, Giuseppe; Michel, Elisabeth; Mazaud, Alain; Ther, Olivier; Ikehara, Minoru; Itaki, Takuya (2021): Impact of the Agulhas Return Current on the oceanography of the Kerguelen Plateau region, Southern Ocean, over the last 40 kyrs. Quaternary Science Reviews, 251, 106711, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.quascirev.2020.106711

  • his work was primarily funded by the NASA-funded RISE-UP: Ross Ice Shelf & Europa Underwater Probe (PI Britney E. Schmidt) project. Field work at the KIS-1 site during the 2019-2020 season was completed through international collaboration between NASA, NSF/USAP, and Antarctica New Zealand, funded by the Aotearoa New Zealand Antarctic Science Platform (ANTA1801) Antarctic Ice Dynamics Project (ASP02101), and the NZARI-funded Aotearoa New Zealand Ross Ice Shelf Programme, “Vulnerability of the Ross Ice Shelf in a Warming World” (grant no. 2014-11). The data contained in this directory are merged and calibrated data files from three missions conducted with ROV Icefin through a borehole drilled through Ross Ice Shelf at KIS1 (-82.78410, -155.26267), near the Kamb Ice Stream grounding zone. Missions were conducted in 2019 on December 16th, 18th, and 21st (UTC). For questions or assistance working with the data please contact Britney Schmidt (britneys@cornell.edu) and Justin Lawrence (jdl287@cornell.edu). Related Publication: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41561-023-01129-y GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.15784/601625

  • Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across multiple depths at (LATITUDE: -77.792300, LONGITUDE: 166.514900). RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.880164

  • Aerial reconnaissance and photography are used in the Ross Sea sector of Antarctica to determine the breeding locations of Adélie penguins and to count the numbers of nests occupied during the early incubation period. From 1981 to present (two-year embargo), all islands and sea coasts between 158°E and 175°E have been searched, and 11 previously unreported breeding colonies discovered. The aim is to census Adélie (Pygoscelis adeliae) populations to provide basic data against which future population levels can be compared in order to monitor environmental change of the Antarctic Ocean ecosystem, both natural and man-induced. GET DATA: https://datastore.landcareresearch.co.nz/en_AU/dataset/adelie-penguin-census-data

  • Cosmogenic surface exposure chronologies were used to quantitatively constrain past rates of ice thinning, and the absolute timing of ice discharge and thinning events. We sampled glacial erratics and bedrock from Byrd Glacier (LW1 Nunatak, LW2 Nunatak, Lonewolf Nuntataks, Tiger Nunatak, Mt. Tadpole). Samples were analysed for their exposure history, and all sites contained glacial erratics. In particular, the Lonewolf Nunataks sites, which is located along the margin of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet revealed a plethora of glacial cobbles. Details of laboratory procedures can be found in the related publication. RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1002/esp.5701 GET DATA: https://version2.ice-d.org/antarctica/publication/1139/

  • Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across multiple depths from 20 cm to 207.5 cm at (latitude: -77.775800, longitude: 166.312800): RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108

  • Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across multiple depths at (LATITUDE: -77.794900, LONGITUDE: 166.334700). RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.880165

  • Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across 11 depths (57 cm, 78.5 cm, 84.5 cm, 87.5 cm, 96.5 cm, 105.5 cm, 108.5 cm, 114.5 cm, 117.5 cm, 120.5 cm, 129.5 cm) at (LATITUDE: -77.781700, LONGITUDE: 166.315300): RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.1017/jog.2022.108