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geoscientificInformation

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  • The New Zealand Quasigeoid2009 (NZGeoid2009) can be used to convert GPS derived ellipsoidal heights to New Zealand Vertical Datum 2009 (NZVD2009) normal-orthometric heights that relate more closely to mean sea level and the local gravity field. NZGeoid2009 can also be used to transform heights to any of the 13 official local vertical datums used across New Zealand, more information on this transformation is available at http://www.linz.govt.nz/geodetic/conversion-coordinates/height-conversions. NZGeoid2009 is formally defined in the LINZ standard LINZS25004 which can be obtained from http://www.linz.govt.nz/geodetic/standards-publications/standards. NZGeoid2009 models the difference between the GRS80 ellipsoid and the geoid over the New Zealand region. The geoid is a theoretical surface of equal gravity that roughly approximates the mean level of the sea across the Earth. NZGeoid2009 is published by LINZ and was computed by enhancing the EGM2008 global gravity model with terrestrial gravity observations over New Zealand and DNSC08 satellite altimetry data over the oceans. The model is published on a one arc-minute grid covering New Zealand's extended exclusive economic zone. The accuracy of NZGeoid2009 is nominally ±0.08 metres across New Zealand. More information on the accuracy in relation to the 13 local vertical datums is provided in LINZS25004.

  • The NZGD2000 Government CORS provides the locations of GNSS Continuously Operating Reference Stations operated by GNS Science under the GeoNet project (http://www.geonet.org.nz). Coordinates are from the LINZ Geodetic Database, in NZGD2000. These are split into several different networks: - PositioNZ - stations predominantly funded by LINZ, with some GeoNet funding. These provide a nationwide coverage of ~120km spacing. More info [here](http://apps.linz.govt.nz/positionz/) - GeoNet - stations funded by the GeoNet project. These are located in areas of geophysical interest, usually on the East Coast of the North Island. More info [here](http://www.geonet.org.nz) - SAGENZ - stations funded by the University of Otago, GNS Science, MIT, University of Colorado and UNAVCO. These Southern Alps Geodetic Experiment - New Zealand stations are generally semi-continuous sites. - Tide Gauge - stations co-located with tide gauges at major ports. Data is managed through the GeoNet project also. 30" RINEX data from all of these sites is available from the [GeoNet website](http://www.geonet.org.nz) Real Time data is available from all PositioNZ stations, and some GeoNet stations. For more information, see the [PositioNZ-RT website](http://apps.linz.govt.nz/positionz/rt/index.php)

  • This layer provides all marks and associated information that have an order of 6 or better. Cadastral surveys are required to connect to these marks if they are within a specified distance. A cadastral survey network mark is a node which is (or was) occupied by a physical survey monument that meets accuracy standards suitable for cadastral requirements. i.e. Cadastral Survey Network Marks have a NZGD2000 horizontal coordinate order of 6 or better. The complete definition for these mark orders is defined by the following Standard. "http://www.linz.govt.nz/survey-titles/cadastral-surveying/cadastral-standards/DocumentSummary.aspx?document=273" When a new cadastral survey network mark is named as part of a cadastral survey dataset (plan) its name consists of a mark type and number that is unique to that survey, followed by the plan number e.g. IS I DP 3456; IS II DP3456.

  • This dataset provides information about the position, position accuracy, mark name, mark type, condition and unique four letter code for geodetic marks in terms of a New Zealand's official geodetic datum. The dataset only contains marks that are within the New Zealand mainland and offshore islands. These positions have been generated using geodetic observations such as precise differential GPS or electronic distance and theodolite angles measurements. The positions are either 2D or 3D depending of the availability of this measurement data. The source data is from Land Information New Zealand's (LINZ) Landonline system where it is used by Land Surveyors. This dataset is updated daily to reflect changes made in the Landonline. Accuracy ============ Geodetic marks with a coordinate order of 5 or less have been positioned in terms of NZGD2000. Lower order marks (order 6 and greater) are derived from cadastral surveys, lower accuracy measurement techniques or inaccurate historical datum transformations, and may be significantly less accurate. The accuracy of NZGD2000 coordinates is described by a series of 'orders' classifications. Positions in terms of NZGD2000 are described by three-dimensional coordinates (latitude, longitude, ellipsoidal height). The accuracy of a survey mark is indicated by its Order. Orders are classifications based on the quality of the coordinate in relation to the datum and in relation to other surrounding marks. For more information see http://www.linz.govt.nz/geodetic/datums-projections-heights/heights/coordinate-orders/ Note that the accuracy applies at the time the mark was last surveyed. Refer to the web geodetic database for historical information about mark coordinates. Note also that the existence of a mark in this dataset does not imply that there is currently a physical mark in the ground - the dataset includes destroyed or lost historical marks. The geodetic database provides more information on the mark status, valid at last time it was visited by LINZ or a maintenance contractor.

  • The NZGD2000 Government CORS provides the locations of GNSS Continuously Operating Reference Stations operated by GNS Science under the GeoNet project (http://www.geonet.org.nz). Coordinates are from the LINZ Geodetic Database, in NZGD2000. These are split into several different networks: - PositioNZ - stations predominantly funded by LINZ, with some GeoNet funding. These provide a nationwide coverage of ~120km spacing. More info [here](http://apps.linz.govt.nz/positionz/) - GeoNet - stations funded by the GeoNet project. These are located in areas of geophysical interest, usually on the East Coast of the North Island. More info [here](http://www.geonet.org.nz) - SAGENZ - stations funded by the University of Otago, GNS Science, MIT, University of Colorado and UNAVCO. These Southern Alps Geodetic Experiment - New Zealand stations are generally semi-continuous sites. - Tide Gauge - stations co-located with tide gauges at major ports. Data is managed through the GeoNet project also. 30" RINEX data from all of these sites is available from the [GeoNet website](http://www.geonet.org.nz) Real Time data is available from all PositioNZ stations, and some GeoNet stations. For more information, see the [PositioNZ-RT website](http://apps.linz.govt.nz/positionz/rt/index.php)

  • This layer provides all marks and associated information that have an order of 6 or better. Cadastral surveys are required to connect to these marks if they are within a specified distance. A cadastral survey network mark is a node which is (or was) occupied by a physical survey monument that meets accuracy standards suitable for cadastral requirements. i.e. Cadastral Survey Network Marks have a NZGD2000 horizontal coordinate order of 6 or better. The complete definition for these mark orders is defined by the following Standard. "http://www.linz.govt.nz/survey-titles/cadastral-surveying/cadastral-standards/DocumentSummary.aspx?document=273" When a new cadastral survey network mark is named as part of a cadastral survey dataset (plan) its name consists of a mark type and number that is unique to that survey, followed by the plan number e.g. IS I DP 3456; IS II DP3456.

  • This dataset provides information about the position, position accuracy, mark name, mark type, condition and unique four letter code for geodetic marks in terms of New Zealand's official geodetic datum for the Ross Dependency. This dataset only includes marks that are within Antarctica. These positions have been generated using geodetic observations such as precise differential GPS or electronic distance and theodolite angles measurements. The positions are either 2D or 3D depending of the availability of this measurement data. The source data is from Land Information New Zealand's (LINZ) Landonline system where it is used by Land Surveyors. This dataset is updated daily to reflect changes made in the Landonline. Accuracy ============ Geodetic marks with a coordinate order of 5 or less have been positioned in terms of Ross Sea Region Geodetic Datum 2000 (RSRGD2000) using precise differential GPS techniques. Marks with order 6 have been positioned in terms of RSRGD2000 using precise horizontal angles and distance measurements. Lower order marks (order 7 and greater) are derived from lower accuracy measurement techniques or historical datum transformations, and may be significantly less accurate. The accuracy of RSRGD2000 coordinates is described by a series of 'orders' classifications. Positions in terms of RSRGD2000 are described by three-dimensional coordinates (latitude, longitude, ellipsoidal height). The accuracy of a survey mark is indicated by its order. Orders are classifications based on the quality of the coordinate in relation to the datum and in relation to other surrounding marks. For more information see http://www.linz.govt.nz/geodetic/datums-projections-heights/heights/coordinate-orders/ Note that the accuracy applies at the time the mark was last surveyed. Refer to the web geodetic database for historical information about mark coordinates. Note also that the existence of a mark in this dataset does not imply that there is currently a physical mark in the ground - the dataset includes destroyed or lost historical marks. The geodetic database provides more information on the mark status, valid at last time it was visited by LINZ.

  • This dataset provides information about the position, position accuracy, mark name, mark type, condition and unique four letter code for geodetic marks in terms of a New Zealand's official geodetic datum. The dataset only contains marks that are within the New Zealand mainland and offshore islands. These positions have been generated using geodetic observations such as precise differential GPS or electronic distance and theodolite angles measurements. The positions are either 2D or 3D depending of the availability of this measurement data. The source data is from Land Information New Zealand's (LINZ) Landonline system where it is used by Land Surveyors. This dataset is updated daily to reflect changes made in the Landonline. Accuracy ============ Geodetic marks with a coordinate order of 5 or less have been positioned in terms of NZGD2000. Lower order marks (order 6 and greater) are derived from cadastral surveys, lower accuracy measurement techniques or inaccurate historical datum transformations, and may be significantly less accurate. The accuracy of NZGD2000 coordinates is described by a series of 'orders' classifications. Positions in terms of NZGD2000 are described by three-dimensional coordinates (latitude, longitude, ellipsoidal height). The accuracy of a survey mark is indicated by its Order. Orders are classifications based on the quality of the coordinate in relation to the datum and in relation to other surrounding marks. For more information see http://www.linz.govt.nz/geodetic/datums-projections-heights/heights/coordinate-orders/ Note that the accuracy applies at the time the mark was last surveyed. Refer to the web geodetic database for historical information about mark coordinates. Note also that the existence of a mark in this dataset does not imply that there is currently a physical mark in the ground - the dataset includes destroyed or lost historical marks. The geodetic database provides more information on the mark status, valid at last time it was visited by LINZ or a maintenance contractor.

  • This file comprises a NZ wide velocity derived from InSAR and GNSS data between 2003 and 2011 published in “ Hamling, I, J., Wright, T. J., Hreinsdottir, S., Wallace, L. M., 2021 A snapshot of New Zealand's dynamic deformation field from Envisat InSAR and GNSS observations between 2003 and 2011 Geophysical Research Letters. The file contains the full InSAR velocities, standalon GNSS over the same period and coastal Vertical Land Movement as detailed in the manuscrtipt DOI: https://doi.org/10.21420/E1C1-MQ19 Cite data as: GNS Science. (2021). A snapshot of New Zealand's dynamic deformation field from Envisat InSAR and GNSS observations between 2003 and 2011 [Data set]. GNS Science. https://doi.org/10.21420/E1C1-MQ19

  • The national airborne gravity dataset is comprised of more than 50,000 linear km of flight observations, covering the three main islands of New Zealand and up to 10km offshore. This dataset provides a 1 arc minute raster image of the Bouguer anomalies, which have been downward continued to the ground surface (McCubbine et al, 2017). The national airborne gravity dataset was collected as a joint project between Land Information New Zealand (LINZ), GNS Science (GNS) and Victoria University of Wellington (VUW). The airborne survey was completed in a total of eight months, over two campaigns: August – October 2013, and February – June 2014. **Users may also be interested in other layers created for the free-air anomalies at ground surface and the along track observations from the gravity flight lines at flight elevation** [NZ Airborne Gravity Free-Air Anomalies at Ground Surface (2013-2014)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/3532) and [NZ Airborne Gravity Flight Lines at Elevation (2013-2014)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/3531). McCubbine, J. Stagpoole, V. Caratori-Tontini, F. Amos, M. Smith, E. and Winefield, R. (2017). Gravity anomaly grids for the New Zealand region. Manuscript submitted for publication New ZealandJournal of Geology and Geophysics.