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  • Data of apparent ice thickness from airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys of fast ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, carried out in Nov/Dec 2009, 2011, 2013, 2016, and 2017. Values are given for apparent thicknesses derived from both, in-phase and quadrature signals. The difference between both thicknesses is a scaled measure of sub-ice platelet layer thickness. Data are from east-west transects across McMurdo Sound, at fixed latitudes. Data were smoothed and interpolated onto a regular longitude grid (0.001 degree increments). More information can be found in Haas et al. (2021). Related Publication: Haas, C., Langhorne, P. J., Rack, W., Leonard, G. H., Brett, G. M., Price, D., Beckers, J. F., and Gough, A. J.: Airborne mapping of the sub-ice platelet layer under fast ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, The Cryosphere, 15, 247–264, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-247-2021, 2021

  • This is GNSS data of four stations covering the grounding zone of Priestley Glacier Antarctica. Tidal modulation of ice streams and their adjacent ice shelves is a real-world experiment to understand ice-dynamic processes. We observe the dynamics of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI) and GNSS. Ocean tides are predominantly diurnal but horizontal GNSS displacements oscillate also semi-diurnally. The oscillations are strongest in the ice shelf and tidal signatures decay near-linearly in the TRI data over >10 km upstream of the grounding line. Tidal flexing is observed >6 km upstream of the grounding line including cm-scale uplift. Tidal grounding line migration is small and <40 % of the ice thickness. The frequency doubling of horizontal displacements relative to the ocean tides is consistent with variable ice-shelf buttressing demonstrated with a visco-elastic Maxwell model. Taken together, this supports previously hypothesized flexural ice softening in the grounding-zone through tides and offers new observational constraints for the role of ice rheology in ice-shelf buttressing. Related Publication: Drews, R., Wild, C. T., Marsh, O. J., Rack, W., Ehlers, T. A., Neckel, N., & Helm, V. (2021). Grounding-zone flow variability of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, in a diurnal tidal regime. Geophysical Research Letters, 48, e2021GL093853. https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GL093853 GET DATA: https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.936090

  • These data were aquired with a Terrestrial Radar Interferometer overlooking the grounding zone of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica. The time series contains differential interferograms with a 12h temporal baseline covering an approximately 8 day period in November 2018. Tidal modulation of ice streams and their adjacent ice shelves is a real-world experiment to understand ice-dynamic processes. We observe the dynamics of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI) and GNSS. Ocean tides are predominantly diurnal but horizontal GNSS displacements oscillate also semi-diurnally. The oscillations are strongest in the ice shelf and tidal signatures decay near-linearly in the TRI data over >10 km upstream of the grounding line. Tidal flexing is observed >6 km upstream of the grounding line including cm-scale uplift. Tidal grounding line migration is small and <40 % of the ice thickness. The frequency doubling of horizontal displacements relative to the ocean tides is consistent with variable ice-shelf buttressing demonstrated with a visco-elastic Maxwell model. Taken together, this supports previously hypothesized flexural ice softening in the grounding-zone through tides and offers new observational constraints for the role of ice rheology in ice-shelf buttressing. Time series of line-of-sight flowfields averaged over approximately three hours. Data were taken with a Terrestrial Radar Interferometer in November 2018 at the grounding zone of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica – The Zip Archive contains 288 Geotiff in South polar stereographic projection – Each raster has 4027 x 4746 entries – The file name details the approximately 3h time inverval of aquisition with Stack_YYYYMMDD_HHMMSS_YYYYMMDD_HHMMSS marking the beginning and end of the time interval, respectively. – The line of sight velocities are given in meters per year Related Publication: Drews, R., Wild, C. T., Marsh, O. J., Rack, W., Ehlers, T. A., Neckel, N., & Helm, V. (2021). Grounding-zone flow variability of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, in a diurnal tidal regime. Geophysical Research Letters, 48, e2021GL093853. https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GL093853 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.935702

  • These data were aquired with a Terrestrial Radar Interferometer overlooking the grounding zone of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica. The time series contains differential interferograms with a 12h temporal baseline covering an approximately 8 day period in November 2018. Tidal modulation of ice streams and their adjacent ice shelves is a real-world experiment to understand ice-dynamic processes. We observe the dynamics of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI) and GNSS. Ocean tides are predominantly diurnal but horizontal GNSS displacements oscillate also semi-diurnally. The oscillations are strongest in the ice shelf and tidal signatures decay near-linearly in the TRI data over >10 km upstream of the grounding line. Tidal flexing is observed >6 km upstream of the grounding line including cm-scale uplift. Tidal grounding line migration is small and <40 % of the ice thickness. The frequency doubling of horizontal displacements relative to the ocean tides is consistent with variable ice-shelf buttressing demonstrated with a visco-elastic Maxwell model. Taken together, this supports previously hypothesized flexural ice softening in the grounding-zone through tides and offers new observational constraints for the role of ice rheology in ice-shelf buttressing. Related Publication: Drews, R., Wild, C. T., Marsh, O. J., Rack, W., Ehlers, T. A., Neckel, N., & Helm, V. (2021). Grounding-zone flow variability of Priestley Glacier, Antarctica, in a diurnal tidal regime. Geophysical Research Letters, 48, e2021GL093853. https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GL093853 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.935707

  • Data of apparent ice thickness from airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys of fast ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, carried out in Nov/Dec 2009, 2011, 2013, 2016, and 2017. Values are given for apparent thicknesses derived from both, in-phase and quadrature signals. The difference between both thicknesses is a scaled measure of sub-ice platelet layer thickness. Data are from east-west transects across McMurdo Sound, at fixed latitudes. Data were smoothed and interpolated onto a regular longitude grid (0.001 degree increments). More information can be found in: Haas, C., Langhorne, P. J., Rack, W., Leonard, G. H., Brett, G. M., Price, D., Beckers, J. F., and Gough, A. J.: Airborne mapping of the sub-ice platelet layer under fast ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica, The Cryosphere, 15, 247–264, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-15-247-2021, 2021

  • Here we present physico-chemical data collected during two research cruises conducted to and across the Ross Sea, Antarctica in the summer of 2018 (February-March) and 2019 (January-February). The dataset includes measurements of temperature, salinity, oxygen, par and transmissivity obtained with a Sea-Bird Electronics (SBE) 911plus CTD. The CTD sensor was configured with SBE 3plus, SBE 4, and SBE 43 dual sensors for the parameters above, in addition to a seapoint fluorescence sensor, and a photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensor (Biospherical Instruments QCP‐2300L‐HP). These data were used to provide oceanographic context to DNA metabarcoding analysis of 18S rRNA V4 region that was carried out on DNA samples collected in parallel to nutrient and chlorophyll-a samples. Fastq samples from DNA metabarcoding analysis and the associated metadata (including nutrients, Chlorophyll-a, and size-fractionated chlorophyll-a) were deposited to GenBank under project numbers PRJNA756172 (2018 cruise) and PRJNA974160 (2019 cruise). The study resulting from this analysis has been submitted to Limnology and Oceanography. RELATED PUBLICATION: Cristi, A., Law, C.S., Pinkerton, M., Lopes dos Santos, A., Safi, K. and Gutiérrez-Rodríguez, A. (2024). Environmental driving forces and phytoplankton diversity across the Ross Sea region during a summer–autumn transition. Limnol Oceanogr. https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.12526

  • A dataset describing exposed bedrock and surficial geology of Antarctica constructed by the GeoMAP Action Group of SCAR (The Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research) and GNS Science, New Zealand. Legacy geological map data have been captured into a geographic information system (GIS), refining its spatial reliability, harmonising classification, then improving representation of glacial sequences and geomorphology. A total 99,080 polygons have been unified for depicting geology at 1:250,000 scale, but locally there are some areas with higher spatial precision. Geological definition in GeoMAP v.2022-08 is founded on a mixed chronostratigraphic- and lithostratigraphic-based classification. Description of rock and moraine polygons employs international GeoSciML data protocols to provide attribute-rich and queriable data; including bibliographic links to 589 source maps and scientific literature. Data are provided under CC-BY License as zipped ArcGIS geodatabase, QGIS geopackage or GoogleEarth kmz files. GeoMAP is the first detailed geological dataset covering all of Antarctica. GeoMAP depicts 'known geology' of rock exposures rather than 'interpreted' sub-ice features and is suitable for continent-wide perspectives and cross-discipline interrogation. Further details are provided at: Cox, S.C., Smith Lyttle, B., Elkind, S. et al. A continent-wide detailed geological map dataset of Antarctica. Sci Data 10, 250 (2023). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41597-023-02152-9 GET DATA: https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.951482

  • Sea ice temperature (°C) measured across multiple depths at (LATITUDE: -77.794900, LONGITUDE: 166.334700). Related Publication: Richter ME, Leonard GH, Smith IJ, Langhorne PJ, Mahoney AR, Parry M. Accuracy and precision when deriving sea-ice thickness from thermistor strings: a comparison of methods. Journal of Glaciology. 2023;69(276):879-898. doi:10.1017/jog.2022.108 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.880165

  • Acoustic volume backscatter measurements were made by an ASL Environmental Sciences Acoustic Zooplankton Fish Profiler (AZFP) operating at four-frequencies (125 kHz, 200 kHz, 455 kHz and 769 kHz). README: https://store.pangaea.de/Publications/Robinson-etal_2020/AZFP2017_README.pdf Further details are provided at: Frazer, E. K., Langhorne, P. J., Leonard, G. H., Robinson, N. J., & Schumayer, D. (2020). Observations of the size distribution of frazil ice in an Ice Shelf Water plume. Geophysical Research Letters, 47, e2020GL090498. https://doi.org/10.1029/2020GL090498

  • The thicknesses of sea ice and sub-ice platelet layer were measured at regular intervals on fast ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica in November and December of 2011. Thirty-metre cross-profiles were established at each site, and snow depths were measured at 0.5 m intervals along the transect lines with a metal ruler. A mean snow depth for each site was derived from these 120 measurements. Freeboard, sea ice thickness and sub-ice platelet layer thickness were recorded at five locations at each site - at the central crossing point and at the end points of each transect. The mean of these was then calculated and taken as representative of the site. Ice thicknesses were measured by using a tape measure with a brass T-anchor attached at the zero mark. This was deployed vertically through the drill-hole and allowed to rotate to a horizontal alignment when exiting the bottom of the drill-hole at the ice-ocean interface. From this position the anchor is slowly pulled upwards until some resistance is met and the first measurement is taken. This resistance is taken to mark the sub-ice platelet layer/ocean interface. The tape measure is then pulled harder, forcing the bar to pass through the sub-ice platelet layer until it sits flush against the sea ice/sub-ice platelet layer interface where a second measurement is taken. Measurement sites were about 5 km apart.