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  • Gravel percentage of seafloor sediments from the New Zealand region from nzSEABED database. Data or descriptions of gravel content are from the top 10 cm of the seafloor. Gravel is defined by its texture/grainsize (all sediment <2mm) and does not reflect the composition of the seafloor sediment.

  • Hillshade (x 1 vertical exaggeration) of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). The hillshade was generated with the sun-illumination from the northwest (315°), at an altitude of 45° above an artificial horizon. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • Sand percentage of seafloor sediments from the New Zealand region from nzSEABED database. Data or descriptions of sand content are from the top 10 cm of the seafloor. Sand is defined by its texture/grainsize (all sediment 63μm-2mm) and does not reflect the composition of the seafloor sediment.

  • Bathmetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). These data are in raster geotiff format and include contour data as shapefiles plus ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • Carbonate percentage of seafloor sediments from the New Zealand region from nzSEABED database. Data or descriptions of carbonate content are from the top 10 cm of the seafloor. The carbonate % represents the contribution of sediment produced by marine organisms (e.g. shells, skeletons). The converse (non-carbonate %) thus represents the contribution of sediment from the land (terrestrial sediment) transported to the marine environment primarily via rivers. The exception to this is that some regions there is also a significant contribution of authigenic minerals (minerals such as glauconite that are formed in the marine environment under specific conditions).

  • Seafloor classification of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). Classification of the multibeam data based on the backscatter intensity as a proxy for substrate type. Classification was done using the ArcMap Image Classification tool using four classes. Training areas where picked to identify areas from high to low backscatter. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • The aspect of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). Aspect identifies the downslope direction of the maximum rate of change in value from each cell to its neighbors. It can be thought of as the slope direction. The values of each cell in the output raster indicate the compass direction that the surface faces at that location. It is measured clockwise in degrees from 0 (due north) to 360 (again due north), coming full circle. Flat areas having no downslope direction are given a value of -1. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • The slope of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). For each cell of bathymetry, the Slope is the maximum rate of change in value from that cell to its neighbors. Basically, the maximum change in elevation over the distance between the cell and its eight neighbors identifies the steepest downhill descent from the cell. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • The rugosity of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). Rugosity (or roughness) of the seafloor is the ratio of surface area to planar area, and is a measure of terrain complexity. Calculated over 3 x 3 neighbouring cells. In the benthic environment, ecological diversity can generally be correlated with environmental complexity. As such, rugosity is often used to help identify areas with potentially high biodiversity. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • The curvature of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). Curvature is the second derivative of the surface, or the slope-of-the-slope. A positive curvature indicates the surface is upwardly convex at that cell. A negative curvature indicates the surface is upwardly concave at that cell. A value of 0 indicates the surface is flat. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.