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  • The rugosity of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). Rugosity (or roughness) of the seafloor is the ratio of surface area to planar area, and is a measure of terrain complexity. Calculated over 3 x 3 neighbouring cells. In the benthic environment, ecological diversity can generally be correlated with environmental complexity. As such, rugosity is often used to help identify areas with potentially high biodiversity. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • Classification of the benthic environment using bathymetric data from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). Generated using Benthic Terrain Modeller (BTM) ArcGIS extension.Wright, D.J., Pendleton, M., Boulware, J., Walbridge, S., Gerlt, B., Eslinger, D., Sampson, D., and Huntley, E. 2012. ArcGIS Benthic Terrain Modeler (BTM), v. 3.0, Environmental Systems Research Institute, NOAA Coastal Services Center, Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management. Available online at http://esriurl.com/5754. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • Hillshade (x 1 vertical exaggeration) of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). The hillshade was generated with the sun-illumination from the northwest (315°), at an altitude of 45° above an artificial horizon. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • Seafloor classification of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). Classification of the multibeam data based on the backscatter intensity as a proxy for substrate type. Classification was done using the ArcMap Image Classification tool using four classes. Training areas where picked to identify areas from high to low backscatter. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • Bathmetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). These data are in raster geotiff format and include contour data as shapefiles plus ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • The aspect of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). Aspect identifies the downslope direction of the maximum rate of change in value from each cell to its neighbors. It can be thought of as the slope direction. The values of each cell in the output raster indicate the compass direction that the surface faces at that location. It is measured clockwise in degrees from 0 (due north) to 360 (again due north), coming full circle. Flat areas having no downslope direction are given a value of -1. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • The slope of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). For each cell of bathymetry, the Slope is the maximum rate of change in value from that cell to its neighbors. Basically, the maximum change in elevation over the distance between the cell and its eight neighbors identifies the steepest downhill descent from the cell. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • The curvature of the bathymetry dataset from the Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui and Tory Channel / Kura Te Au Hydrographic Survey LINZ Project HYD-2016/17-01 (HS51). Curvature is the second derivative of the surface, or the slope-of-the-slope. A positive curvature indicates the surface is upwardly convex at that cell. A negative curvature indicates the surface is upwardly concave at that cell. A value of 0 indicates the surface is flat. These data are in raster geotiff format and include ESRI layer files and QGIS GML files for symbology.

  • We generally enjoy good water quality in the Sounds however some activities can impact on that. Sewage, run-off from land, sedimentation, vessel discharge, marine farm discharges and boat maintenance activities can all have a negative effect. Water quality monitoring was established in Queen Charlotte Sound/Tōtaranu in 2011 and in Pelorus Sound/Te Hoiere in 2012. Information collected each month on temperature, nutrient levels, phytoplankton and seawater chemistry is proving to be important for understanding how the Sounds ecosystems work. Council’s coastal monitoring programme provides essential information for good decisions on resource consents, future planning and protection for the Sounds. This scientific data will also feed into a national database run by Land Air Water Aotearoa (LAWA), alongside the recreational bathing data. This can be accessed via the link below to LAWA monitored beaches. For more information contact Dr Steve Urlich, Marlborough District Council coastal scientist steve.urlich@marlborough.govt.nz or Ph: 03 520 7400. Council has developed a Coastal Report Card to summarise annual monitoring results for key water quality parameters from Tōtaranui/Queen Charlotte Sound and Te Hoiere/Pelorus Sound. The 2015/16 report card can be found, along with a comprehensive analysis of monitoring data from 2014/15 by following the link below. https://www.marlborough.govt.nz/environment/coastal/coastal-reports-and-special-investigations In addition, there are: a) Corresponding CTD data (incl DO, fluorometry etc). b) Phytoplankton cell counts at each water quality station c) Zooplankton counts from the water-quality samples (to June 2014). Near-bed samples are collected using a Van Dorn at about 2 m above seabed. Up until June 2014, the near surface samples were also collected using a Van Dorn – at about 1 m below sea-surface. From July 2014, near-surface samples have been collected using a hose-sampler that extends from surface to approx. 15 m below surface (so collects a depth integrated sample). Up until June 2014, POC and PON were measured. Thereafter, PC and PN were measured.