From 1 - 10 / 12
  • Raster chart image of: NZ 8247 Ha'apai Group - northern portion This data was compiled for the use at the following scale: 1:72600 File reference: A08247 THIS DATA DOES NOT REPLACE NAUTICAL CHARTS AND MUST NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION. The hydrographic raster data made available through the LINZ Data Service is based on the Paper Navigational Charts published and maintained by the New Zealand Hydrographic Authority at Land Information New Zealand (LINZ). The online New Zealand Chart Catalogue provides more detailed and the most up to date information about New Zealand charts: [New Zealand Chart Catalogue](http://www.linz.govt.nz/hydro/charts/nz202-chart-catalogue) Information on symbols and abbreviations used on nautical charts: [Symbols and Abbreviations](http://www.linz.govt.nz/hydro/charts/chart-symbols-terms-abbreviations) Hydrographic standards and specifications for nautical charts and publications: [Standards and Specifications](http://www.linz.govt.nz/hydro/regulation/)

  • This table provides the relationships between building outlines within mainland New Zealand when buildings are split or merged. A building outline is a 2D representation of the roof outline of a building which has been classified from LINZ aerial imagery using a combination of automated and manual processes to extract and refine a building roof outline. **Data vintage** This dataset does not include building outline geometry, but provides the linkages between building_id's from different aerial imagery sources in the [NZ Building Outlines (All Sources)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/101292) dataset when building outlines change from single outlines split into multiple outlines, and from multiple outlines merged as single outlines. This dataset will be updated with changes in building_id relationships as new aerial imagery becomes available. Please refer to the [NZ Building Outlines Data Dictionary](https://nz-buildings.readthedocs.io/en/latest/introduction.html) for detailed metadata and information about this dataset. **Related building outlines data** [NZ Building Outlines (All Sources)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/101292) - directly related to this dataset, it contains all combinations of building outlines from multiple years of imagery that have existed since the beginning of this dataset. [NZ Building Outlines](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/101290) - provides current building outlines only derived from the latest LINZ aerial imagery.

  • Raster chart image of: NZ 8247 Ha'apai Group - northern portion This data was compiled for the use at the following scale: 1:72600 File reference: A08247 THIS DATA DOES NOT REPLACE NAUTICAL CHARTS AND MUST NOT TO BE USED FOR NAVIGATION. The hydrographic raster data made available through the LINZ Data Service is based on the Paper Navigational Charts published and maintained by the New Zealand Hydrographic Authority at Land Information New Zealand (LINZ). The online New Zealand Chart Catalogue provides more detailed and the most up to date information about New Zealand charts: [New Zealand Chart Catalogue](http://www.linz.govt.nz/hydro/charts/nz202-chart-catalogue) Information on symbols and abbreviations used on nautical charts: [Symbols and Abbreviations](http://www.linz.govt.nz/hydro/charts/chart-symbols-terms-abbreviations) Hydrographic standards and specifications for nautical charts and publications: [Standards and Specifications](http://www.linz.govt.nz/hydro/regulation/)

  • We undertake a seismic hazard analysis of the Clyde Dam site, fulfilling Phase 3 of the Clyde Dam Seismic Hazard Reassessment study. Site-specific horizontal magnitude-weighted earthquake acceleration spectra (5% damping), and relative displacement spectra are developed for the Clyde Dam site, and the site conditions of Class B Rock are assumed for the site. Cite as: Stirling MW, Litchfield NJ, Rhoades DA, McVerry GH, Van Dissen RJ. 2012. Clyde Dam seismic hazard reassessment, phase 3: seismic hazard analysis. Lower Hutt (NZ): GNS Science. 86 p. Consultancy Report 2012/168. Prepared for Contact Energy. doi:10.21420/8JG9-TJ73. The follow-on work from Consultancy Report 2012/168 has been crafted into a journal paper for publication in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America: Stirling MW, Abbott ER, Rood DH, McVerry GH, Abrahamson NA, Barrell DJA, Huso R, Litchfield NJ, Luna L, Rhoades DA, et al. In review. First use of fragile geologic features to constrain the design motions for a major existing engineered structure. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America

  • We present an excel spreadsheet tool called TaupōInflate and its user documentation. TaupōInflate is an easy-to-use and freely available tool to calculate and plot ground deformation from magmatic inflation at depth beneath Taupō caldera. It can be used to assess potential sources of inflation associated with unrest events at Lake Taupō. It can also be used as an educational resource for exploring general questions such as the likelihood of detecting inflating magma bodies beneath the lake. Last updated: June 2022 (minor bug fix in dike vector plot) DOI:https://doi.org/10.21420/8B35-TK45 Cite data as: GNS Science. (2022). TaupōInflate: An Excel spreadsheet to calculate ground deformation from magma inflation at Lake Taupō [Data set]. GNS Science. https://doi.org/10.21420/8B35-TK45

  • The QualityRankings table records the quality of each source dataset or reference. Where multiple references are given in the feature classes, the ranking of the highest overall quality record is assigned to the dataset. For example, if a previously-mapped dataset was updated by the Version 1.0 NZ Landslide Dam Database authors using more recent satellite imagery or terrain models, then the metadata record for the updated mapping is linked to the landslide DamSite points via the Metadata ID field. In Version 1.0 of the database, this table contains attributes that are specific to the quality of the whole source dataset, not individual landslide dams. This might be improved in future versions of the database.

  • The National Environmental Data Centre (NEDC) online directory http://nedc.nz is a website resource that provides information on environmental datasets for Aotearoa New Zealand and in some places wider coverage. The datasets are each hosted by one of New Zealand's Crown Research Institutes; AgResearch, ESR, GNS Science, Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research, NIWA, Scion and Plant & Food Research. The datasets are categorised in terms of Atmosphere, Biodiversity, Climate, Freshwater, Geology, Land and Ocean themes.

  • New Zealand Tsunami Database includes information about tsunamis that have reached the coastline of New Zealand since humans arrived in this land until the present day. The database is primarily the work of historical seismologist Gaye Downes working for GNS Science who collected reports of tsunamis around New Zealand and, in many cases, carried out research to determine parameters of the source, travel time and impact associated with each event. Reports of tsunamis that make up the core of this database come from tide gauges, newspaper articles, harbour masters, records from ships, personal diary entries and Māori oral records. This primary source material is summarised in the database and complete transcriptions are held by the database custodian. DOI: https://doi.org/10.21420/D6W9-0G74 Cite as: GNS Science. (2020). New Zealand Tsunami Database: Historical and Modern Records [Data set]. GNS Science. https://doi.org/10.21420/D6W9-0G74

  • State-of-the-art climate models often fail to capture non-linear, abrupt shifts in the climate system, even though such changes are observed in paleoclimate records and could occur in the future. This is likely because traditional, process-based models are built for numerical stability, and thus are not suitable for capturing rapid climate events (large amplitude – short time scale). To have confidence in both paleoclimate reconstructions and future projections, modellers and paleoclimate scientists need new tools to identify and incorporate the potential for sudden transitions. Dynamical systems theory offers a complementary alternative approach to traditional models, dealing with perturbations through simplified numerical schemes which are better suited for non-linear processes and can robustly identify and characterise tipping points. Here we test the application of dynamical systems theory to identify early warning signals (EWS) of tipping points in paleoclimate datasets. Tipping points and non-linear state transitions are documented in many paleoclimate proxy records, including those derived from ice and marine sediment cores. We use the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) as an example of a bi-modal system to illustrate one element or process that is capable of tipping which can have cascading consequences throughout the climate system. We first identify and characterise paleoclimate records that show signals of rapid change in the AMOC or other connected climate elements. We then test a simple 1D dynamical systems model on proxy records that exhibit critical transitions to evaluate the potential for using EWS to identify tipping points before they occur. We also explore how abrupt change in the earth system can be communicated more effectively to highlight the potential for rapid changes. This is critical in the current context of continued increase in greenhouse gases emissions and the need to act urgently to mitigate catastrophic consequences of climate change. DOI: 10.21420/4ST0-4G62 Cite video as: GNS Science. 2022. Video explaining abrupt climate change_CDF2022. Lower Hutt (NZ): GNS Science. https://doi.org/10.21420/4ST0-4G62

  • For use in several inputs to the 2022 update to the New Zealand National Seismic Hazard Model (NZ NSHM 2022), we develop an augmented New Zealand earthquake catalogue in which we import higher-quality earthquake depths and depth uncertainties, focal mechanisms, and some locations and magnitudes from several relocated and global catalogues. These are imported into and combined with the Christophersen et al. (2022) NSHM earthquake catalogue (link further down in Other resources), in which the local magnitudes that comprise most of the GeoNet catalogue were brought into alignment with moment magnitude in a way that ensures consistency through time. Next, we use event depths, focal mechanisms, 3D models of the Hikurangi and Puysegur subduction interfaces, and relative plate motion directions to classify earthquakes as upper-plate, interface or intraslab, with special treatment of the remaining lower-quality event depths in the augmented catalogue. DOI: https://doi.org/10.21420/1SJE-E991 Cite data as: GNS Science. (2022). Augmented NZ earthquake catalogue used in NZ NSHM 2022 [Data set]. GNS Science. https://doi.org/10.21420/1SJE-E991 NSHM report explaining construction of the augmented catalogue: Rollins C, Thingbaijam KK, Hutchinson, J, Gerstenberger M, Christophersen A, Eberhart-Phillips D, Rastin SJ, Van Dissen R. 2021. An augmented New Zealand earthquake catalogue, event classifications, and models of the depth distribution of shallow earthquakes in the greater New Zealand region Lower Hutt (NZ): GNS Science. 83 p. (GNS Science report; 2021/58). https://nshm-static-reports.gns.cri.nz/NSHM/ScienceReports/SR2021-58%20NSHM%20Earthquake%20Depths_FINAL.pdf