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  • NitrateWatch project (SSIF Project 6) is gathering nitrate data from around New Zealand. Our goal is to provide this information visually to our stakeholders via a map interface • NitrateWatch is aimed at generating new knowledge about nitrates in rural drinking water across New Zealand. • We aim to highlight nitrate hot spots and benchmark nitrate levels for rural drinking water by collecting data from drinking water samples submitted by rural residents. • A further goal is to improve stakeholder engagement through working more closely with iwi, Regional Councils, district Councils, Government agencies and local communities in readiness for future cooperation. • Data generated from this project serves as a talking point to showcase GNS’ leadership in the groundwater/drinking water space. • Our data provides future opportunities for GNS groundwater staff to build new projects leveraged off NitrateWatch

  • Petlab is New Zealand’s national rock, mineral and geoanalytical database. It is operated by GNS Science, with GNS Science, Auckland, Waikato, Massey, Victoria, Canterbury and Otago universities all contributing data. The database contains locations, descriptions and analyses of rock and mineral samples from on- and offshore New Zealand, Antarctica and worldwide. Petlab now contains 212096 sample records; 60572 have analytical data. Last updated on March 3, 2022. DOI: https://doi.org/10.21420/9djh-rp34 Cite as: GNS Science. (2004). Petlab: New Zealand’s national rock, mineral and geoanalytical database. [Data set]. GNS Science. https://doi.org/10.21420/9DJH-RP34

  • The dataset supports the Geochemical Atlas of Aotearoa New Zealand (Martin et al. 2023) that highlights the variation in trace element concentrations in near-surface soil materials across Te Ika-a-Māui North Island, Te Waipounamu South Island and Rakiura Stewart Island. Samples were sourced from previous studies, collated from 833 sites from the top 30 cm (maximum) of soil by hand auger from across Aotearoa New Zealand. All samples were dried and sieved to <2 mm, and 15 g aliquots were analysed for a suite of 65 elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ga, Gd, Ge, Hf, Hg, Ho, In, K, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Pr, Pt, Rb, Re, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Tb, Te, Th, Ti, Tl, Tm, U, V, W, Y, Yb, Zn and Zr) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) on aqua regia digests. The dataset contains Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) GIS grids of the 65 elements and a polygon GIS feature layer based on the 1:250 000 Geological Map of New Zealand (2020) with mean concentrations of 65 elements for ~230 rock groups across the country. The sample locations have been collapsed to StatisticsNZ meshblock polygons in a point GIS feature layer and a spreadsheet table to protect privacy. These grids and feature layers enable an understanding of the geochemical composition and spatial variation of Aotearoa New Zealand's soils attributable to natural (geogenic) and human (anthropogenic) influences. The supporting publication is: Martin AP, Turnbull RE, Roudier P, Cavanagh J, Rattenbury MS, Rogers KM, Vandergoes MJ, Reyes L, Gard HJL, Richardson SJ, et al. 2023. Geochemical atlas of Aotearoa New Zealand. Lower Hutt (NZ): GNS Science. 247 p. (GNS Science report; 2023/23). https://doi.org/10.21420/p9bk-7016

  • The dataset supports a geochemical atlas of Wellington (Morgenstern et al. 2024) and shows the abundance and variability of element concentrations within surficial soil material across the study area. Sampling was undertaken between December 2022 and April 2023 at 151 sites across an area spanning from Paekākāriki and the Remutaka Road Summit to the southern coastline, and from the Remutaka Ranges to the western coastline. Highly urbanised land (domestic and commercial properties) was sampled, as well as a variety of other, more natural land use types (native regenerating park, native park, exotic park, exotic forest, agricultural pasture) for comparison. At each site, two samples were collected using a hand auger: the upper O-depth (0–2 cm) and a shallow A-depth (2–20 cm). Several deeper B-depth (50–70 cm) samples were also collected for statistical analysis. Samples were dried, sieved to <2 mm and split into 15 g sample sizes, before being analysed for a suite of 65 elements (Ag, Al, As, Au, B, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ga, Gd, Ge, Hf, Hg, Ho, In, K, La, Li, Lu, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Nb, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Pr, Pt, Rb, Re, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Sm, Sn, Sr, Ta, Tb, Te, Th, Ti, Tl, Tm, U, V, W, Y, Yb, Zn and Zr) using aqua regia digestion and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). Most analytes have all or most measured values above their lower method detection limit and analytical results have undergone comprehensive quality assurance and quality control, and are internally consistent and in line with typical worldwide concentration ranges of the analytes. The data are available in two forms; a spreadsheet of element concentrations for all depths sampled with sample locations collapsed to StatisticsNZ 2024 meshblocks to protect privacy and a zipped ArcGIS geodatabase of Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) grids for each of the 65 elements. Morgenstern R, Martin AP, Turnbull RE, Norton K, Rattenbury MS, Rogers KM. 2024. Urban Geochemical Atlas of Wellington, New Zealand. Lower Hutt (NZ): GNS Science. 128 p. (GNS Science report; 2024/01). https://doi.org/10.21420/8adh-f354