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  • PAR (Oddesey) and temperature sensors (Hobo) were deployed in the ice under red, green, and blue acrylic sheets to examine the response of rhodopsin-bearing cells to environmental stress. Sensors were placed near the top, middle and bottom of the sea ice and left in place for 2 weeks. GET DATA: ken.ryan@vuw.ac.nz

  • Polar regions are experiencing some of the most dramatic effects of climate change resulting in large-scale changes in sea ice cover. Despite this, there are relatively few long-term studies on polar species that evaluate the full scope of these effects. Over the last two decades, this team has conducted globally unique demographic studies of Adélie penguins in the Ross Sea, Antarctica, to explore several potential mechanisms for population change. This five-year project will use penguin-borne sensors to evaluate foraging conditions and behavior and environmental conditions on early life stages of Adélie penguins. Results will help to better understand population dynamics and how populations might respond to future environmental change. To promote STEM literacy, education and public outreach efforts will include multiple activities. The PenguinCam and PenguinScience.com website (impacts of >1 million hits per month and use by >300 classrooms/~10,000 students) will be continued. Each field season will also have ‘Live From the Penguins’ Skype calls to classes (~120/season). Classroom-ready activities that are aligned with Next Generation Science Standards will be developed with media products and science journal papers translated to grade 5-8 literacy level. The project will also train early career scientists, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students and post-graduate interns. Finally, in partnership with an Environmental Leadership Program, the team will host 2-year Roger Arliner Young Conservation Fellow, which is a program designed to increase opportunities for recent college graduates of color to learn about, engage with, and enter the environmental conservation sector. Further details are provided at: Morandini, V., Dugger, K. M., Schmidt, A. E., Varsani, A., Lescroël, A., Ballard, G., Lyver, P. O., Barton, K., & Ainley, D. G. (2024). Sex-specific recruitment rates contribute to male-biased sex ratio in Adélie penguins. Ecology and Evolution, 14, e10859. https://doi.org/10.1002/ece3.10859 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.15784/601444

  • 12 ApRES (Autonomous phase-sensitive Radio Echo Sounder) ice-penetrating radars were deployed on the Ross Ice Shelf in 2021/22 to measure basal melting. Each radar measures a profile of the ice shelf, typically at hourly intervals. Changes in the range of the basal and internal reflectors can be used to estimate basal melting. Instruments return a small subset of data in near real time via Iridium SBD telemetry, allowing a crude estimate of melting. Full resolution data is stored the instrument and can only be recovered with site visits. Instruments suffered failures during 2022, so the data sets have significant gaps within 2022/23. Data type: Binary as described in ApRES manual Instrument details are provided at: Nicholls KW, Corr HFJ, Stewart CL, Lok LB, Brennan PV, Vaughan DG. A ground-based radar for measuring vertical strain rates and time-varying basal melt rates in ice sheets and shelves. Journal of Glaciology. 2015;61(230):1079-1087. https://doi.org/10.3189/2015JoG15J073 GET DATA: craig.stewart@niwa.co.nz

  • 50 TMS Soil Sensors were deployed in Taylor Valley from December 2021-January 2023 to measure temperature (air, land surface and soil) and soil moisture. The sensors record data every 15 minutes and are placed in nested plots of 2x 1km^2 plots with 3x30m^2 nests and 3 sensors in 3 x 1m^2 plots. Data are available in csv file format. GET DATA: tamara.pletzer@postgrad.otago.ac.nz or marwan.katurji@canterbury.ac.nz

  • This metadata record represents environmental data from oceanographic moorings at Granite Harbour South. Conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and currents were measured at ~20-meter depth for 12 months to characterise variability in the nearshore habitat. These instruments form part of the Antarctic Nearshore and Terrestrial Observation Systems (ANTOS). The combined analyses of coastal currents and sea ice conditions with genetic and trophic data were used to understand the influence of key drivers on the interconnectedness of existing Ross Sea populations, and on the resilience of key benthic species to environmental change. The data will be made available at the ANTOS website: https://antosdb.org Mooring Coordinates: Granite Harbour South (-77.01594444, 162.87616667) GET DATA: vonda.cummings@niwa.co.nz

  • The oceanographic mooring (-77.891050, 166.258333) to characterise the upper ocean. GET DATA: natalie.robinson@niwa.co.nz

  • This metadata record represents environmental data from oceanographic moorings at Granite Harbour Middle (-77.00406667, 162.58795000). Conductivity, temperature, depth (CTD), photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and currents were measured at ~20-meter depth for 12 months to characterise variability in the nearshore habitat. These instruments form part of the Antarctic Nearshore and Terrestrial Observation Systems (ANTOS), and the data will be made available at the ANTOS website: https://antosdb.org GET DATA: vonda.cummings@niwa.co.nz

  • This metadata record represents meteorological data and in situ and isotopic measurements of the isotopic ratio of water vapor from the ablating ice from two lakes in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. Lake ice and water samples (from the surface water and at depth via SCUBA) were collected in vials. Ice samples at Lake Bonney were collected daily, and at Lake Fryxell samples were collected approximately twice per day. Lake ice samples were also collected at Lake Fryxell along three transects spaced approximately every 300 to 500 m (meters) across the lake surface. Water vapor isotope flux measurements were collected via air inlets which were installed at 0.5, 1.0, and 3.0 m on the tower using ¼″ OD Teflon tubes. The lines were insulated and continuously pumped at a flow rate of approximately 10 L min−1 using a secondary pump. Meteorological measurements with a Vaisala HMP100 probe for temperature and relative humidity readings and an RM Young wind vane (model 05108) for wind velocity measurements, at heights of 3.0 and 0.5 m. Air temperature, relative humidity, wind velocity, and lake surface temperature measurements were recorded every minute via a Campbell Scientific CR1000 data logger. Spatial Coordinates: Lake Bonney (-77.60672778, 162.44982222) Lake Fryxell (-77.60672778, 163.12508611) Further details are provided at: A. W. Bellagamba, M. Berkelhammer, L. Winslow, P. T. Doran, K. F. Myers, S. Devlin & I. Hawes (2021) The magnitude and climate sensitivity of isotopic fractionation from ablation of Antarctic Dry Valley lakes, Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research, 53:1, 352-371, https://doi.org/10.1080/15230430.2021.2001899 GET DATA: https://uofi.app.box.com/s/6vakvltbsn1nhrpzudffclrn5iufpoux/folder/88268262341

  • The oceanographic mooring (-77.81830000, 165.40590000) which records temperature, salinity, and current flow at multiple depths for full 12-month cycles represents a step-change in our ability to monitor the flow of Ice Shelf Water – which carries the signature of deep ice shelf melt – northwards and out of the Ross/McMurdo Ice Shelf cavity through western McMurdo Sound. The site will be revisited in during the 2024/25 field season to recover the instruments and download their data. Our intention is to collect a total of 36 months of data (3x 12-month deployment/recovery cycles) in order to characterise the Ice Shelf Water outflow and the scale of its inter-annual variability. GET DATA: natalie.robinson@niwa.co.nz

  • This metadata records represents aerial surveying of land temperature variability and microclimate, with an infrared and visible camera system. In December and January 2023, airborne surveys were undertaken in the Taylor Valley in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, plus one scan along the coastline to Terra Nova Bay. Pre-defined flight tracks covered three different areas, chosen for their different surfaces and moisture content. The flights were timed to coincide with MODIS and Landsat satellite overpasses The data was used to: (1) validate a newly developed geostatistical downscaling model for land surface temperature in the unique environment of the McMurdo Dry Valleys; (2) investigate bias in satellite derived land and ice surface temperature related to subpixel variations in surface types; (3) validate WRF-Hydro/Glacier model performance in simulating spatially distributed conditions for melt and the routing of meltwater; (4) lay some of the groundwork for establishing a network of ecological “sentinel sites”, where the greatest environmental change is expected. Data is in HCC format for the infrared and JPG for RGB imagery. GET DATA: eva.nielsen@pg.canterbury.ac.nz or marwan.katurji@canterbury.ac.nz