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  • New Zealand is not immune to ocean acidification. The ‘Munida transect’ Time-series in sub-antarctic waters off Otago is the Southern Hemisphere’s longest-running record of pH measurements. Monitoring since 1998 has established a decline in pH that reflects the increase in atmospheric CO2 recorded at NIWA’s atmospheric research station near Wellington. The Munida time-series is led by NIWA’s Kim Currie, in collaboration with the University of Otago's Department of Chemistry. Every two months she has collected water samples along a 65-kilometre line from the tip of Otago Harbour out to sub-antarctic waters. This time-series is particularly valuable because it covers both subtropical and sub-antarctic waters in a one-day trip, so is in a unique location. During the transect University of Otago scientists measure the pH while Currie measures alkalinity, total dissolved inorganic carbon and CO2 as well as other related parameters. The supporting data help to determine what processes are causing changes in the properties of the water masses, including the changes in pH. For example, pH is linked to temperature and therefore varies between summer and winter and also year to year. Parameters in the data set include: XCO2_DRY - Mole fraction of carbon dioxide (dry air) in the headspace of the equilibrator, unit micromole / mole XH2O - Mole fraction of water vapour (dry air) in the headspace of the equilibrator, unit micromole / mole EQ_PRE - The pressure in the equilibrator head space in hectopascal EQ_TEMP - The temperature of the water in the equilibrator PCO2_WAT - The Partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the water body in units of microatmospheres

  • CTD data collected during Marta Guerra's PhD project 'Foraging ecology of sperm whales at Kaikōura'. Time coverage: 30-May-2015 to 2-Jan-2018, including autumn/winter field season ('winter', May-July) and spring/summer field season ('summer', Nov-Jan), with a total of 3 winters and 3 summers. CTD casts collected daily (weather permitting) throughout the duration of each field season (each field season lasted typically 8 weeks). Spatial coverage: study area centered over the Kaikōura Canyon. Approximate area: from Kaikōura peninsula, extending out to 12 nautical mile offshore navigational limit to the East and Southeast, and extending 15 nautical miles from the Kaikōura peninsula to the South. CTD carried out over seafloor depths of c. 200m to c. 1500m. Measured variables: temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a concentration. CTD depths: variable, down to a maximum of 550 m. Instrument type: Winter 2015 = CTD Seabird scientific SBE-19, with WET-Star fluorometer. Maximum depth = 100m. Sampling frequency = 4 Hz. All other seasons = CTD RBR-concerto, with Turner Designs Cyclops-7 fluorometer. Maximum depth = 550m. Sampling frequency = 4 Hz. Platform type: hand-hauling from 6m outboard-powered vessel 'RV Grampus'. Quality control: data were deleted from the processed files when there was a known malfunction with one of the sensors. The processed files also had the upcast deleted from them, as well as the measurements in air, and acclimatisation period at the surface (1 minute since submersion). For more details on the original research project, access PhD thesis here: http://hdl.handle.net/10523/9189 ** NB. If you use these data, please include the following acknowledgements: Data collection and processing - Marta Guerra; Funding - New Zealand Whale and Dolphin Trust, Whale Watch Kaikoura, University of Otago, Ministry of Primary Industries.

  • From 1997 to 2008, a research programme to determine if fish assemblages in the New Zealand region could be classified into clearly identifiable communities based on their associations with each other and with environmental features was undertaken. The programme resulted in the creation of the Fish Communities Database, from which this dataset was extracted. The data set includes records from 1964 to 2008. These data have been used to show geographical and depth distributions of species from all research tows within the New Zealand EEZ since 2008. The main source of data was the Ministry for Primary Industries research trawl database.

  • Dataset contains vertical profiles of depth, temperature and salinity measured by SBE-19 and SBE-25 Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) probes between 2000/02/14 and 2020/11/23 at a station (45.833°S 171.500°E) in Subantarctic Surface Water (SASW) east of New Zealand from bi-monthly cruises of the R/V Munida and R/V Polaris II on the Munida time series transect.

  • Ocean acidification conditions around the New Zealand coast are being measured to establish baseline conditions and to quantify future change. The NZOA-ON is a network of coastal sites around the country – a mix of pristine and urban sites, and sites which are of particular interest to regional councils, the aquaculture and fishing industries, and sites of scientific interest. Data will be used to determine local conditions, and to provide a baseline against which to measure future change. This network is linked into the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON The network uses existing data collection infrastructure where possible to take advantage of auxiliary data and historic records. Sampling partners collect fortnightly water samples, liaise regarding shipment and logistics, and assist with deployment of the sensors. Sampling partners collecting the water samples, possibly as part of existing monitoring programmes, have access to the data to help them with their own management strategies. Sampling partners include regional councils, the Department of Conservation, and aquaculture industries. Water samples are taken fortnightly at each site (see Figure 1 for the sampling sites) by the sampling partners, then the full crates are returned to Dunedin for analysis of acidity parameters - alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon (to develop a long-term data series). We then calculate pHT, pCO2, carbonate ion concentration, and saturation states. NIWA provides sampling partners with bottles, crates, chemically resistant gloves and training (including health and safety information). The actual sampling isn’t difficult, however sampling partners are required to use a droplet bottle to add a couple of drops of mercuric chloride (which is toxic) into the full sample bottles, so that the seawater is ‘preserved’ until it gets to the lab. SeaFET pH sensors[2] are deployed for 4-5 months at each site, and are moved from site to site to help determine short term variability at each location. Additional parameters are measured at the Dunedin and Firth of Thames sites, so that these sites meet the extra requirements of the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON). The network uses data collection infrastructure where possible to take advantage of auxiliary data and historic records.

  • A moment tensor describes the source parameters of an earthquake such as the focal mechanism (the geometry of how the crust ruptured in the earthquake) and the seismic moment (the amount of energy released). Since August 2003 when sufficient broadband seismometers were deployed, GeoNet has been able to routinely compute moment tensor solutions for New Zealand earthquakes with M > ~4. The CSV file of moment tensor solutions is updated when a moment tensor solution is calculated. Moment Tensor Solutions can be found in Github here: https://github.com/GeoNet/data/tree/main/moment-tensor. DOI: 10.21420/MMJ9-CZ67 Cite as: GNS Science. (2006). GeoNet Aotearoa New Zealand Earthquake Moment Tensor solutions [Data set]. GNS Science, GeoNet. https://doi.org/10.21420/MMJ9-CZ67

  • The Petroleum / Mineral / Coal Reports dataset is one of six datasets that make up the Bibliographic Database. Under the Crown Minerals Act, these reports are submitted to the New Zealand government by holders of prospecting, exploration or mining permits and become publicly available at some stage. Records for and online links to the petroleum / mineral / coal reports are available through the Online Exploration Database (https://data.nzpam.govt.nz) of NZ Petroleum & Minerals (NZP&M). Equivalent records for the petroleum / mineral / coal reports were created in the GNS Science Bibliographic Database in order to facilitate the discovery of these items when GNS Science staff search the Bibliographic Database. Links are provided to most of the petroleum reports. In addition, GNS Staff can search for petroleum reports using the Petroleum Report Search webpage (http://online.gns.cri.nz/online/prsearch/) where links are also provided either to a copy held by GNS Science or to a copy held by the NZ government. Every indexed report has a unique BIB ID number in addition to its assigned PR (petroleum), MR (mineral) or CR (coal) number.

  • The Theses dataset is one of six datasets that make up the Bibliographic Database. The Theses dataset is a New Zealand geoscience bibliography that includes: 1) theses undertaken within all Geology and Earth Science Departments in New Zealand universities, regardless of whether on a New Zealand or overseas topic; 2) theses with substantial original research in solid earth sciences (including soils but excluding, meteorological and atmospheric and ocean studies) undertaken in other departments in New Zealand universities; 3) theses with substantial original research in the solid earth sciences of New Zealand undertaken in overseas universities; 4) theses completed by GNS Science staff or visitors. Every indexed thesis has a unique BIB ID number. Note it is not a complete record for NZ theses.

  • The National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) for New Zealand provides probabilistic estimates of the strength of earthquake shaking that can be expected according to a user-defined time period and probability, e.g. the peak ground acceleration (PGA) that has a 10% chance of happening in any 50 year time window. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) uses the location, recurrence behaviour, and predicted ground motions of earthquake sources to estimate the hazard at a site, or across a grid of sites as shown in the map below for Class C (shallow soil) site conditions. The NSHM is an algorithm that draws upon several component models to calculate its results. It uses a fault model that combines New Zealand’s active fault database, which includes 536 fault sources, and the 170 year historical earthquake catalogue. The background model is comprised of a multi-layered background seismicity grid DOI: https://doi.org/10.21420/MX74-Q807 Site as: GNS Science. (2020). National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) for New Zealand. GNS Science. https://doi.org/10.21420/MX74-Q807

  • This dataset contains Biome-BGC v4.2 model outputs of national pasture production forced with present day and 4 future projected CO2 Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP past, 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5) taken from the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. Meteorological inputs used to run the model were downscaled from six different General Circulation Models (GCMs): BCC-CSM1.1, CESM1-CAM5, GFDL-CM3, GISS-EL-R, HadGEM2-ES, and NorESM1-M. Outputs are provided for two different parameterizations of the Biome-BGC model to describe New Zealand’s two dominant types of pasture, dairy and sheep. The model was run at each point on NIWA’s Virtual Climate Station Network (VCSN), a 5 x 5 km national grid. The data consists of daily outputs at each grid box of net primary productivity (NPP), gross primary productivity, net ecosystem productivity (NEP), evapotranspiration (ET), water outflow, evaporation, transpiration, and soil water content, spanning 1971 – 2005 (RCP past) or 2006 – 2100 (RCP 2.6, 4.5, 6.0, and 8.5).