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2023

187 record(s)
 
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  • This layer contains the DSM for LiDAR data in the Gisborne Region, captured between 11 to 20 September 2023. - The DEM is available as layer [Gisborne LiDAR 1m DEM (2023)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/115847). - The Index Tiles are available as layer [Gisborne LiDAR Index Tiles (2023)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/115845). - The LAS point cloud and vendor project reports are available from [OpenTopography](https://portal.opentopography.org/datasets?search=new%20zealand). LiDAR was captured for NIWA by Landpro Ltd between 11 to 20 September 2023. These datasets were generated by Landpro and their subcontractors. Data management and distribution is by Toitū Te Whenua Land Information New Zealand. Data comprises: - DEM: tif or asc tiles in NZTM2000 projection, tiled into a 1:1,000 tile layout - DSM: tif or asc tiles in NZTM2000 projection, tiled into a 1:1,000 tile layout - Point cloud: las tiles in NZTM2000 projection, tiled into a 1:1,000 tile layout Pulse density specification is at a minimum of 4 pulses/square metre. Vertical Accuracy Specification is +/- 0.2m (95%) Horizontal Accuracy Specification is +/- 1.0m (95%) Vertical datum is NZVD2016.

  • Orthophotography within the Marlborough region captured in the 2023-2024 flying season. Imagery was captured for Marlborough District Council by SkyCan between 23 Oct 2023 and 23 Nov 2023. Data comprises: • 3484 ortho-rectified RGB GeoTIFF images in NZTM projection, tiled into the LINZ Standard 1:500 tile layout. • Tile layout in NZTM projection containing relevant information. Imagery supplied as 7.5cm pixel resolution (0.075m GSD). Final spatial accuracy is +/-0.3m on flat open ground within the stereo extent of the survey. Also available on: • [Basemaps](https://basemaps.linz.govt.nz/@-41.4468443,173.8366700,z8.91?i=marlborough-2023-0.075m) • [NZ Imagery - Registry of Open Data on AWS](https://registry.opendata.aws/nz-imagery/) Index tiles for this dataset are available as layer [Marlborough 0.075m Urban Aerial Photos Index Tiles (2023)](http://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/115785)

  • Index Tiles ONLY, for actual orthophotos see layer [Marlborough 0.075m Urban Aerial Photos (2023)](http://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/115757) Orthophotography within the Marlborough region captured in the 2023-2024 flying season. Imagery was captured for Marlborough District Council by SKYCAN between 23 Oct 2023 and 23 Nov 2023. Data comprises: • 3484 ortho-rectified RGB GeoTIFF images in NZTM projection, tiled into the LINZ Standard 1:500 tile layout. • Tile layout in NZTM projection containing relevant information. Imagery supplied as 7.5cm pixel resolution (0.075m GSD). Final spatial accuracy is +/-0.3m on flat open ground within the stereo extent of the survey. Also available on: • [Basemaps](https://basemaps.linz.govt.nz/@-41.4468443,173.8366700,z8.91?i=marlborough-2023-0.075m) • [NZ Imagery - Registry of Open Data on AWS](https://registry.opendata.aws/nz-imagery/)

  • This layer contains the DEM for LiDAR data for the Waimakariri River in the Canterbury Region, captured on 14 June 2023 and 17 July 2023. - The DSM is available as layer [Canterbury - Waimakariri LiDAR 1m DSM (2023)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/115796). - The index tiles are available as layer [Canterbury - Waimakariri LiDAR Index Tiles (2023)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/115797). - The LAS point cloud and vendor project reports are available from [OpenTopography](https://portal.opentopography.org/datasets?search=new%20zealand). LiDAR was captured for Environment Canterbury Regional Council and Waimakariri District Council by Aerial Surveys Ltd on 14 June 2023 and 17 July 2023. These datasets were generated by Arial Surveys Ltd and their subcontractors. Data management and distribution is by Toitū Te Whenua Land Information New Zealand. Data comprises: - DEM: tif or asc tiles in NZTM2000 projection, tiled into a 1:1,000 tile layout - DSM: tif or asc tiles in NZTM2000 projection, tiled into a 1:1,000 tile layout - Point cloud: las tiles in NZTM2000 projection, tiled into a 1:1,000 tile layout Pulse density specification is at a minimum of 4 pulses/square metre. Vertical Accuracy Specification is +/- 0.2m (95%) Horizontal Accuracy Specification is +/- 1.0m (95%) Vertical datum is NZVD2016.

  • Ocean–atmosphere–sea ice interactions are key to understanding the future of the Southern Ocean and the Antarctic continent. Regional coupled climate–sea ice–ocean models have been developed for several polar regions; however the conservation of heat and mass fluxes between coupled models is often overlooked due to computational difficulties. At regional scale, the non-conservation of water and energy can lead to model drift over multi-year model simulations. Here we present P-SKRIPS version 1, a new version of the SKRIPS coupled model setup for the Ross Sea region. Our development includes a full conservation of heat and mass fluxes transferred between the climate (PWRF) and sea ice–ocean (MITgcm) models. We examine open water, sea ice cover, and ice sheet interfaces. We show the evidence of the flux conservation in the results of a 1-month-long summer and 1-month-long winter test experiment. P-SKRIPS v.1 shows the implications of conserving heat flux over the Terra Nova Bay and Ross Sea polynyas in August 2016, eliminating the mismatch between total flux calculation in PWRF and MITgcm up to 922 W m−2. RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-16-3355-2023 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7739062

  • Ocean–atmosphere–sea ice interactions are key to understanding the future of the Southern Ocean and the Antarctic continent. Regional coupled climate–sea ice–ocean models have been developed for several polar regions; however the conservation of heat and mass fluxes between coupled models is often overlooked due to computational difficulties. At regional scale, the non-conservation of water and energy can lead to model drift over multi-year model simulations. Here we present P-SKRIPS version 1, a new version of the SKRIPS coupled model setup for the Ross Sea region. Our development includes a full conservation of heat and mass fluxes transferred between the climate (PWRF) and sea ice–ocean (MITgcm) models. We examine open water, sea ice cover, and ice sheet interfaces. We show the evidence of the flux conservation in the results of a 1-month-long summer and 1-month-long winter test experiment. P-SKRIPS v.1 shows the implications of conserving heat flux over the Terra Nova Bay and Ross Sea polynyas in August 2016, eliminating the mismatch between total flux calculation in PWRF and MITgcm up to 922 W m−2. RELATED PUBLICATION: https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-16-3355-2023 GET DATA: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.7739059

  • The WWLLN Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Sensor was installed at Scott Base in November 2015 by Dr. James Brundell and Ms. Emma Douma as part of Antarctica New Zealand Event K060-1516-A. The sensor measures the electric field in the Very Low Frequency radio range (~500 Hz-50 kHz) and passes it to a PC which processes the data for the experiments. The antenna is located behind the Hatherton lab. It was installed due to increasing manmade electromagnetic noise levels in the "quiet zone" at Arrival Heights. The observations from this antenna are now the primary WWLLN feed from Ross Island, the Arrival Height's magnetic field antenna is now a backup. WWLLN, uses the VLF feed but processes it to detect the radio-wave pulses from lightning. WWLLN observations are sent to a central processing computer to determine the time and location of lightning pulses all over the globe. The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) is an experimental Very Low Frequency (VLF) network of sensors being developed through collaborations with research institutions across the globe. The network exploits the considerable electromagnetic power radiated by lightning as "sferics" present in the VLF band. By combining radio-pulse observations from at least 5 stations, the WWLLN central processing computers can determine the location of the original lightning discharge. As the radio-pulse observations are immediately sent back across the internet to the central processing computers locations are generated within ~10 s of the discharge, and thus near real time. There are currently about 70 active VLF receiving stations operating in the VLF World-Wide Lightning Location Network, including the Scott Base measurements. WWLLN observations are continuously transmitted to one of the WWLLN primary servers, in this case flash.ess.washington.edu at the University of Washington, Seattle, USA. GET DATA: https://space.physics.otago.ac.nz/aarddvark/

  • Ultraviolet radiation measurements over the spectral region 290-450 nm with a high precision spectro-radiometer. The spectro-radiometer was installed at Arrival Heights as a two month (November 2006 – January 2007) blind inter-comparison with the established measurement programme run by Biospherical Instruments for the USAP. The data was compared with the USAP data taken simultaneously. These data are held internally by NIWA. GET DATA: contact dan.smale@niwa.co.nz

  • This layer contains the index tiles for LiDAR data for Selwyn in the Canterbury region, captured between 24 March 2023 and 04 May 2023. - The DEM is available as layer [Canterbury - Selwyn LiDAR 1m DEM (2023)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/115805). - The DSM is available as layer [Canterbury - Selywn LiDAR 1m DSM (2023)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/115806). - The LAS point cloud is available as layer [Canterbury - Selywn LiDAR Point Cloud (2023)](https://data.linz.govt.nz/layer/d3RtF9GKtV9pqYL). - The vendor project report is available for download from [Selwyn LiDAR 2023 Survey Report](https://data.linz.govt.nz/document/25132-selwyn-lidar-2023-survey-report). LiDAR was captured for Environment Canterbury Regional Council by Landpro Ltd between 24 March 2023 and 4 May 2023. These datasets were generated by Landpro Ltd and their subcontractors. Data management and distribution is by Toitū Te Whenua Land Information New Zealand. Data comprises: - DEM: tif or asc tiles in NZTM2000 projection, tiled into a 1:1,000 tile layout - DSM: tif or asc tiles in NZTM2000 projection, tiled into a 1:1,000 tile layout - Point cloud: las tiles in NZTM2000 projection, tiled into a 1:1,000 tile layout Pulse density specification is at a minimum of 4 pulses/square metre. Vertical Accuracy Specification is +/- 0.2m (95%) Horizontal Accuracy Specification is +/- 1.0m (95%) Vertical datum is NZVD2016.

  • The AARDDVARK/WWLLN Very Low Frequency (VLF) Radio Sensor was installed at Arrival Heights from 10-15 December 2008 by Dr Craig J. Rodger and Dr. James Brundell as part of Antarctica New Zealand Event K069a. The sensor measures the magnetic field in the Very Low Frequency radio range (~500 Hz-50 kHz), and passes it to a PC which processes the data for the experiments. The primary experiment is the AARDDVARK observations. The secondary experiment, WWLLN, uses exactly the same VLF feed but processes it to detect the radio-wave pulses from lightning. WWLLN observations are sent to a central processing computer to determine the time and location of lightning pulses all over the globe. The World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) is an experimental Very Low Frequency (VLF) network of sensors being developed through collaborations with research institutions across the globe. The network exploits the considerable electromagnetic power radiated by lightning as "sferics" present in the VLF band. By combining radio-pulse observations from at least 5 stations, the WWLLN central processing computers can determine the location of the original lightning discharge. As the radio-pulse observations are immediately sent back across the internet to the central processing computers locations are generated within ~10 s of the discharge, and thus near real time. There are currently about 70 active VLF receiving stations operating in the VLF World-Wide Lightning Location Network, including the "Scott Base" measurements made at Arrival Heights or near the Hatherton Lab (depending on noise levels). WWLLN observations are continuously transmitted to one of the WWLLN primary servers, in this case flash.ess.washington.edu at the University of Washington, Seattle, USA. Two near-orthogonal magnetic field loops measuring VLF electromagnetic waves. The centre of the antenna is at 77° 49.790' S, 166° 39.438' E, based on a GPS measurement with 1 m accuracy. Logging is undertaken with standard WWLLN software, with GPS timing. GET DATA: https://wwlln.net/